Links to Dr Doug Belshaw’s keynote

To follow up from the IoE TEL SDD, here are the links to the keynote and free book offer.

 

Marie Stowell also circulated these links that you might like to explore:

Making Student Engagement a Reality: Turning Theory into Practice

http://www.guildhe.ac.uk/blog/making-student-engagement-a-reality-turning-theory-into-practice/

Learning design has greatest impact on student satisfaction

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/newsroom/learning-design-has-greatest-impact-on-student-satisfaction#.VlRNAVRFDcs

SAP Projects 2015-2016 Developing Student Digital Literacy sub-group

We were successful in being awarded 3 Student as Academic Partners TEL projects this year- summaries below

Interdisciplinary SAP project 1 2015-2016
Developing Digital Literacy and Employability
Nominated Project Lead(s):

Moira Savage, Senior Lecturer (IoE)

Dr Anthony Barnett, Senior Lecturer (IoE)

Kira Butcher (student- Chair of Enterprise team)
We would really like more colleagues and students to join us- please email m.savage@worc.ac.uk and/or come along to the next meeting:

Developing Student Digital Literacy sub group on Tuesday 24th November at 2.45- 4.45 in BY1147

Proposed by the University of Worcester Developing Student Digital Literacy sub-group in response to the Technology Enhanced Learning Strategy 2015-2019 in relation to development priority C. Developing the digital skills and capabilities of students. Projects are intentionally interdisciplinary and focus upon elements of the student digital experience whilst studying at the University of Worcester.
Ongoing support for the project is available from the group:

Chair: Moira Savage, University of Worcester Learning & Teaching Fellow & Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

Students Union: Lewis Arnold (Vice President Education) & David Tomkins (Communications Coordinator)

Student Services: Ellen Williams (Student Achievement Officer), Adela Cragg (Careers- The Worcester Award) & Patrick Clark (Specialist Learning Support Service Manager,

Disability and Dyslexia Service)

Information and Learning Services: Dr Sarah Pittaway

Learning, Teaching and Technology Unit: Libby Symonds

Academics: David Hunt & Gareth Hunt (IoE)

The importance of equipping our students with the appropriate 21st Century digital capabilities, for the transition into the world of graduate employment, is reflected in the current QAA Higher Education Review themes of Student Employability and Digital Literacy. Leeds Metropolitan University and Oxford Brookes University are two examples where the digital literacy component has been formalised within graduate attributes and/or curriculum design frameworks.
We would like to collaborate with students to explore and identify where opportunities currently exist, or could exist in the future, to support employability related to generic digital literacy skills. If appropriate, we could explore how digital Open Badges could be attained and added to your LinkedIn profile related to your studies.
Interdisciplinary SAP project  2 2015-2016
Mapping the digital experiences of students at the University of Worcester.
Nominated Project Lead(s):

Dr Paul Golz, Senior Lecturer (ISES)  

Moira Savage, Senior Lecturer (IoE)

Francesca Ellis (Student WBS)

Debbie Doyle (Student)
We would really like more colleagues and students to join us- please email m.savage@worc.ac.uk and/or come along to the next meeting:

Developing Student Digital Literacy sub group on Tuesday 24th November at 2.45- 4.45 in BY1147

Proposed by the University of Worcester Developing Student Digital Literacy sub-group in response to the Technology Enhanced Learning Strategy 2015-2019 in relation to development priority C. Developing the digital skills and capabilities of students. Projects are intentionally interdisciplinary and focus upon elements of the student digital experience whilst studying at the University of Worcester.
Ongoing support for the project is available from the group:

Chair: Moira Savage, University of Worcester Learning & Teaching Fellow & Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

Students Union: Lewis Arnold (Vice President Education) & David Tomkins (Communications Coordinator)

Student Services: Ellen Williams (Student Achievement Officer), Adela Cragg (Careers- The Worcester Award) & Patrick Clark (Specialist Learning Support Service Manager,

Disability and Dyslexia Service)

Information and Learning Services: Dr Sarah Pittaway

Learning, Teaching and Technology Unit: Libby Symonds

Academics: David Hunt & Gareth Hunt (IoE)

Students have a diverse array of digital platforms and service available to them during their study at UW. Many of these are bespoke solutions created independently by individual stakeholders, such as academics, administrators, Registry, IT, LTTU, ILS, Student Services and the Students Union. With such a wide range of platforms students report issues around locating the particular service they require and how to use the service once it is found. Bespoke solutions typically engender a higher learning curve in both understanding purpose and accessing content anyway and this may be exasperated by the sandboxed nature of the services.

The main aim of this project would be to produce a dynamic map for existing and new students to signpost who does what and how to access and understand those services. Where existing guides exist these can be linked into the map. As well as being useful to existing students we would aim to create a guide available for use in induction next year to assist new students. The master guide would be deployed to each institute and could be tailored appropriately.

Interdisciplinary SAP project  3 2015-2016
Inbox Overload? Understanding the scale and scope of automated and en masse communication from the university to students.
Nominated Project Lead(s):

Moira Savage, Senior Lecturer (IoE)

Dr Paul Golz, Senior Lecturer (ISES)

Francesca Ellis (Student WBS)

Debbie Doyle (Student)
We would really like more colleagues and students to join us- please email m.savage@worc.ac.uk and/or come along to the next meeting:

Developing Student Digital Literacy sub group on Tuesday 24th November at 2.45- 4.45 in BY1147

Proposed by the University of Worcester Developing Student Digital Literacy sub-group in response to the Technology Enhanced Learning Strategy 2015-2019 in relation to development priority C. Developing the digital skills and capabilities of students. Projects are intentionally interdisciplinary and focus upon elements of the student digital experience whilst studying at the University of Worcester.
Ongoing support for the project is available from the group:

Chair: Moira Savage, University of Worcester Learning & Teaching Fellow & Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

Students Union: Lewis Arnold (Vice President Education) & David Tomkins (Communications Coordinator)

Student Services: Ellen Williams (Student Achievement Officer), Adela Cragg (Careers- The Worcester Award) & Patrick Clark (Specialist Learning Support Service Manager,

Disability and Dyslexia Service)

Information and Learning Services: Dr Sarah Pittaway

Learning, Teaching and Technology Unit: Libby Symonds

Academics: David Hunt & Gareth Hunt (IoE)

Email communication is used extensively by UW, both automated system communications (e.g. Blackboard), en masse emails as well as personal communications from tutors. The project seeks to understand the typical scale and scope of communication from the university to students.
Communication is an essential part of the relationship between the University and the students and often features in the analysis of NSS scores. It is important to research the attitudinal understanding the students have towards these various types of email communication in order to define best practices for use of this medium.
This project has two goals: to understand the volume and nature of email communications from UW, and to improve (where possible) our mailing strategy. An action research approach will be taken to investigate what options are available within systems and associated apps (e.g. Blackboard Learn Mobile) to manage the flow of communication in line with personal preferences.

“I know I am just a student but….’ An education provider’s perspectives in supporting students to raise concerns about professional practice in the context of safeguarding children.” (Area 6)

Claire Richards (NCSPVA) & Catriona Robinson (IoE)

The paper will present the initial findings of a study which aimed to highlight aspects of professional practice dilemmas for students of Early Childhood Studies and Education where they are working with children and families. Consequent to students’ understanding of their safeguarding responsibilities, dilemmas are identified when theory and practice may be at a critical variance. Early Years practitioners and Teachers continue to play an increasingly pivotal role in their safeguarding responsibilities to promote the rights of children. The promotion of the voice of the child is viewed as synonymous to hearing the voice of the student where concerns are identified in the context of professional practice. The university seeks to offer procedural approaches to enable students to raise concerns and access emotional support from staff. The study therefore examines the role and implication for academic staff in this process. The research is a qualitative study and acquired ethical approval from the Institute’s Ethics Committee of the Worcester of University. The results of this research indicate that students do identify a range of anxieties in the context of professional practice and there is a strong message that there is a need for more teaching focus on safeguarding children in preparation for practice. Academic staff have also indicated some concern about the need for support and further training on this issue.

“Final year midwifery students’ views and experiences of telling and listening to practice-related stories” (Area 2&7)

Poster and Oral presentation
Ros Weston, (IHS)
This paper describes preliminary findings of an initial study. The aim was to explore final year midwifery students’ views and experiences of telling and listening to practice-related stories. The chosen methodology was naturalistic interpretative inquiry. The target population was final year midwifery students, registered in one university in the academic year 2014/2015. A small purposive sample of four final year midwifery students was recruited. Three participants took part in a focus group, and one in a conversational interview. Data were electronically recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Stories assisted students to reflect on practice, helping to make learning more real. Students deliberately retold stories for motivation and support. Storytelling can be cathartic. ‘Cautionary tales’, told by lecturers, about mistakes in practice, motivated students to avoid making mistakes. Mentors’ stories aided students to feel part of a team. Service users’ stories, told in class, helped students to empathize with women in practice. These findings have potential significance for curriculum design, educators and mentors, they will be explored further in the main Doctoral Study.

“New Ways of Engaging Students with Employability Opportunities” (Areas 1&2) Poster

Debbie Lambert and Cristina Florescu (Regional Engagement Manager)

‘Win-Win’ is a project that offers an online portal where external organisations can advertise voluntary work experience opportunities and placements for students. The initial aim was to test the success of different methods of promoting Win-Win through social media. However, a development with the potential to enhance the student engagement has been identified by the student partner: adding a page where students can advertise their skills and be selected by relevant organisations. The development has been implemented and promoted using Facebook as a social media platform and traditional means such as leaflets and posters. The results showed a higher level of student engagement. At the moment, the Facebook page has 84 followers, ten students have advertised their skills on the website so far and five have been targeted by external organisations. A final conclusion about the efficiency of the project cannot yet be drawn. The promotion of the project is still ongoing and we are expecting a further rise in the number of students who access the project. We are going to monitor this rise by analysing and comparing the number of hits on the website, at different stages of the project.

“Inter-professional learning: innovation in teaching and learning for pre-registration student nurses and midwives” (Areas 1 and 4)

Toni Martin & Sherri Ogston-Tuck, (IHS)

A requirement for all health care professionals is to work collaboratively in the provision of safe and effective care. Despite this students are not routinely involved in inter-professional learning, and are often taught in isolation within professional groupings. There is added value in inter-professional teaching and learning- evident from a resource that was developed by lecturers in nursing and midwifery within the University. This was piloted live on an audience of pre-registration nursing and midwifery students, as a mock fitness to practice hearing. Inter-professional group activities provided reflection, debate and discussion with students voting on sanctions and taking part in the panel summary and close. Feedback from both lecturers/participants (n=8) and students (n=31) indicated this was a highly valued experience. It is an innovative inter-professional learning resource, in pre-registration education for students in nursing and midwifery and will extend to post registration health care education.

“Technology enhanced learning in PE; a participatory action research project to enhance the course experience and future professional development of secondary physical education trainee teachers.” (Area 1)

Kerry Whitehouse, Stephanie Clark, Andy Morgan, Nicole Streather, Gemma Taylor, Andy Wilks. (ISES/IoE)

Use of technology in physical education has long been debated regarding pupil learning and active engagement (Capel and Whitehead 2010). Trainee teachers’ confidence to use technology within lessons is varied and often forms barriers to professional development (Thomas and Stratton 2006, Okposio 2011). The rapidly changing landscape of new technologies, along with the variance between school resources and support highlights the importance of technology to enhance the course experience. This participatory action research project involved five volunteer secondary PE PGCE trainees. Its aims were to evaluate the impact on pupil learning and engagement of using selected technologies, to create an e-resource. And, to gain feedback on the impact of undertaking this project, on trainee teacher development. Each participant evaluated the technologies they selected with a data capture template; an e-resource was designed which 20 PGCE PE trainees trialed and evaluated in placement schools. Participant action researchers took part in a focus group to reflect upon the impact of this project upon their own professional development. Findings indicate the technologies used had a positive impact upon pupils; promoting independent learning, developing self-esteem and enhancing pupil progress, and, improved professional development through collaboration, reflection and enhancing research skills. An e-resource has been produced to support the training of physical education teachers in future years. A copy of the resource will be available at this presentation.

The digital student

As we continue to talk about developing the digital literacy of our student body, a few quick links on the topic in the wider UK and international context.

Oxford Brookes make direct reference to digital and information literacy in their graduate attributes (including postgraduate) at https://www.brookes.ac.uk/OCSLD/Your-development/Teaching-and-learning/Graduate-attributes/ . Further resources are available on their wiki https://wiki.brookes.ac.uk/display/GAA/Digital+and+Information+Literacy

Leeds Metropolitan University have a thought-provoking document: Embedding Digital Literacy as a Graduate Attribute- refocusing the undergraduate curriculum at https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/partners/files/UG_Embedding_Digital_Literacy.pdf

For an international perspective, Deakin University in Australia http://www.deakin.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/38006/digital-literacy.pdf

Jisc projects relating to the Digital Student can be found at http://www.jisc.ac.uk/rd/projects/digital-student . The Jisc 7 elements model can be explored at  http://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/developing-students-digital-literacy